Tag Archives | Physiological

The split brain: a tale of two halves

A while ago I posted some videos of Roger Sperry’s research into lateralisation of function in epileptic patients who had had their corpus callosum severed to varying degrees. Now for more Sperry related goodies. There is a great article over at the Nature about the cohort of participants who had their corpus callosum severed and have since been the focus of both […]

Are we over interpreting fMRI results?

Recently we have looked at the impressive progression in the ability of fMRI scanners to record brain activity in ‘real time’ but are we over interpreting these results?  Over the last decade-or-two more-and-more researchers have been turning to fMRI scanners to open the ‘black box’ which is the brain. These scanners measure brain activity by […]

Looking inside the brain in real time. Possible?

Could it soon really be possible to look inside the brain in ‘real time’. Over the last three decades we have made leaps-and-bounds in developing non-invasive processes to scan brains; PET, MRI, fMRI etc. These scanning techniques have allowed psychologists an insight into the processes of the brain during specific tasks or just to investigate […]

Video: Hemisphere Disconnection & Lateralisation of Function

In the AS course we look a the Sperry study of hemisphere disconnection and the findings surrounding lateralisation of function. It can be quite a difficult and dry study (although it’s one of my favorites and I have a fab PowerPoint that I will put in the resources share) and videos are few-and-far-between so thanks […]

The double edged sword of the cabbies’ hippocampi

With all the conferences that are going on lots of us are starting to look forward to the new 2008 specifications: what are the studies like; what else have the authors done? One of the new studies in the physiological psychology module of the AS is Maguire’s research into the size of London cabbies’ hippocampus. […]

Why blame me? It was all my brain’s fault!

This is a review of an article from The Times – The dubious rise of ‘neurolaw.  The article links in well with the Raine et al. study.  I’ve written before about studies looking at the effect of brain damage on behaviour and if this could mitigate criminal behaviour and it seems that in some cases […]