Tag Archives | obedience

Questioning the Banality of Evil

There has been an almost widespread consensus amongst social psychologists that tyranny triumphs either because ordinary people blindly follow orders or else because they mindlessly conform to powerful roles. Much of this consensus has been influenced by the work of Milgram and Zimbardo However, more recently, British psychologists S. Alexander Haslam and Stephen D. Reicher […]

Would People Obey Today? Part I: Ethics

With the recent announcement of Jerry Berger’s (2009) soon-to-be-published (but available to download here) Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey I will be writing a series of articles considering the theories, methods and repercussions of both Berger’s 2009 research and the original that started this journey over 50-years-ago. Part I: Ethics Part II: Was it […]

Resisting Authority: Memories from a defiant participant

I’ve just read an account of a participant from the original Milgram experiment. The account in the January 2004 issue of Jewish Currents recounts Joseph Dimow’s experience at the hands of Milgram and the experimenter. When is it proper to refuse to obey authority figures, even if they have been democratically chosen for their positions? […]

Milgram meet the 21st Century: Virtual Obedience?

The massive ethical issues surrounding Milgram’s study of obedience have always made it difficult to replicate it in a psychological setting (although this hasn’t stopped TV companies jumping on the concept). Recently in the UK a group of psychologists at UCL have worked around this problem using virtual reality. Each of the 23 participants wore […]