Tag Archives | core studies

Is a home smoking ban enough to stop teen smoking?

We all know the power of role models and I have written about the effect of role modes on behaviour many times before: from the moving ‘Children See, Children Do‘ campaign to talking about the effectiveness of the pictures of death and destruction that now adorn our fag packets. All these ideas are supported by […]

Are we over interpreting fMRI results?

Recently we have looked at the impressive progression in the ability of fMRI scanners to record brain activity in ‘real time’ but are we over interpreting these results?  Over the last decade-or-two more-and-more researchers have been turning to fMRI scanners to open the ‘black box’ which is the brain. These scanners measure brain activity by […]

Would People Obey Today? Part I: Ethics

With the recent announcement of Jerry Berger’s (2009) soon-to-be-published (but available to download here) Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey I will be writing a series of articles considering the theories, methods and repercussions of both Berger’s 2009 research and the original that started this journey over 50-years-ago. Part I: Ethics Part II: Was it […]

Projective Tests: What do you see?

Probably one of the most iconic tests that jump to mind when a person starts talking about going to a psychologist (or ‘shrink’) is the inkblot tests.  These tests, correctly referred to as the Rorschach Inkblot tests were surrounded in ‘secrecy’ as practicing psychologists who used them thought that the tests would be invalid if […]

A selection of ‘Strange Stories’ – Theory of Mind & Autism.

Only the other week I was talking about the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes‘ task that Baron-Cohen employed in his 1997 research looking at high functioning adults with Autism and Aspergers. In order to validate the Eyes Task as a theory of mind task, participants in the two clinical groups (ASD & Tourette’s) were […]

Talk about Tyranny

The addition of the new Reicher & Haslam study to the course has introduced to many a long-argued debate surrounding Zimbardo’s original Stanford Prison Experiment; calling into question his conclusions and situational explanation for the behaviour that was seen.   Reicher & Haslam argue against this in their 2006 research from the BBC’s The Experiment (and they […]

Resisting Authority: Memories from a defiant participant

I’ve just read an account of a participant from the original Milgram experiment. The account in the January 2004 issue of Jewish Currents recounts Joseph Dimow’s experience at the hands of Milgram and the experimenter. When is it proper to refuse to obey authority figures, even if they have been democratically chosen for their positions? […]