Tag Archives | AS

Griffiths: Cognitive Bias and Skill in Gambling

“… Rational choice theory predicts that people will not gamble, thus it is theorised that regular gamblers gamble because they make the wrong decisions – that cognitive bias (irrational thinking) distorts their reasoning. The aim of this study was to increase understanding of the cognitive processes and behaviour of persistent fruit machine gamblers.” Almost 18 […]

Zimbardo on Milgram and Obedience

There’s a nice little two part piece on The Situationist which has Zimbardo commenting on Milgram’s work. Well worth a read. “Milgram left us with a vital legacy of brilliant ideas that began with those centered on obedience to authority and extended into many new realms—urban psychology, the small-world problem, six degrees of separation, and […]

Would People Obey Today? Part I: Ethics

With the recent announcement of Jerry Berger’s (2009) soon-to-be-published (but available to download here) Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey I will be writing a series of articles considering the theories, methods and repercussions of both Berger’s 2009 research and the original that started this journey over 50-years-ago. Part I: Ethics Part II: Was it […]

Projective Tests: What do you see?

Probably one of the most iconic tests that jump to mind when a person starts talking about going to a psychologist (or ‘shrink’) is the inkblot tests.  These tests, correctly referred to as the Rorschach Inkblot tests were surrounded in ‘secrecy’ as practicing psychologists who used them thought that the tests would be invalid if […]

A selection of ‘Strange Stories’ – Theory of Mind & Autism.

Only the other week I was talking about the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes‘ task that Baron-Cohen employed in his 1997 research looking at high functioning adults with Autism and Aspergers. In order to validate the Eyes Task as a theory of mind task, participants in the two clinical groups (ASD & Tourette’s) were […]

Talk about Tyranny

The addition of the new Reicher & Haslam study to the course has introduced to many a long-argued debate surrounding Zimbardo’s original Stanford Prison Experiment; calling into question his conclusions and situational explanation for the behaviour that was seen.   Reicher & Haslam argue against this in their 2006 research from the BBC’s The Experiment (and they […]