Archive | Forensic Psychology

Keeping Current: The British Crime Survey

Within Crime-Victim interaction we look at the ‘fear of crime’ and many students learn about the British Crime Survey as part of this. More-and-more so students are using out-dated versions of the BCS (like pre-2000 which seems to be in many text books) which are methodologically flawed in their delivery. Following a review in 2001 […]

Children see. Children do.

The influence of our role models on behaviour is something of particular interest to psychologists and we study it through the entire psychology course. More specifically we look at the research conducted by Bandura and his work into Social Learning Theory (SLT) in the imitation of aggression. In a television advertisement called “Children See. Children […]

Why blame me? It was all my brain’s fault!

This is a review of an article from The Times – The dubious rise of ‘neurolaw.  The article links in well with the Raine et al. study.  I’ve written before about studies looking at the effect of brain damage on behaviour and if this could mitigate criminal behaviour and it seems that in some cases […]

Do bad guys lie? Social desirability on self-reports

When researching crime (and most other things come to think about it) in psychology we tend to have to resort to self-report measures. The gut reaction to any self-report measure when thinking about evaluation issues is that the participants may give socially desirable answers – especially when asking about offending behaviour. The Deception Blog has […]

Gotcha. New police interview technique

In the A2 Crime course we look at Interview and Negotiation techniques and investigate which ones are effective at soliciting the most information out of witnesses to an offence. Shifting uncomfortably in your seat? Stumbling over your words? Can’t hold your questioner’s gaze? Police interviewing strategies place great emphasis on such visual and speech-related cues, […]